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Gold

  1. Fill out the form on the right and get your FREE and INSURED appraisal kit.
  2. When you get the kit, fill the postage paid package with your gold, silver, diamonds, platinum, jewelry, watches, coins & rings and drop it in the mail.
  3. We will appraise your package and call you immediately to offer you the highest payout possible!

Gold Overview

Gold is a dense, soft, shiny metal and the most malleable and ductile metal known.  Pure gold has a bright yellow color and luster traditionally considered attractive, which it maintains without oxidizing in air or water. Gold is one of the least reactive solid chemical elements. Gold therefore occurs often in free elemental form, as nuggets or grains in rocks, in veins and in alluvial deposits. Less commonly, gold occurs in minerals as gold compounds, usually with tellurium.

 

Gold resists attacks by individual acids, but it can be dissolved by the aqua regia (nitro-hydrochloric acid), so named because it dissolves gold. Gold also dissolves in alkaline solutions of cyanide, which have been used in mining. Gold dissolves in mercury, forming amalgam alloys. Gold is insoluble in nitric acid, which dissolves silver and base metals, a property that has long been used to confirm the presence of gold in items, giving rise to the term the acid test.

 

Gold has been a valuable and highly sought-after precious metal for coinage, jewelry, and other arts since long before the beginning of recorded history. Gold standards have been the most common basis for monetary policies throughout human history, being widely supplanted by fiat currency only in the late 20th century. Gold has also been frequently linked to a wide variety of symbolisms and ideologies. A total of 165,000 tons of gold have been mined in human history, as of 2009. The world consumption of new gold produced is about 50% in jewelry, 40% in investments, and 10% in industry.

 

Besides its widespread monetary and symbolic functions, gold has many practical uses in dentistry, electronics, and other fields. Its high malleability, ductility, resistance to corrosion and most other chemical reactions, and conductivity of electricity lead to many uses of gold, including electric wiring, colored glass production and gold leaf.

 

Gold Jewelry

Because of the softness of pure 24 carat gold, it is usually alloyed with base metals for use in gold jewelry, altering its hardness and ductility, melting point, color and other properties. Alloys with lower caratage, typically 22k, 18k, 14k or 10k, contain higher percentages of copper, or other base metals or silver or palladium in the alloy. Copper is the most commonly used base metal, yielding a redder color. Eighteen-carat gold containing 25% copper is found in antique and Russian gold jewelry and has a distinct, though not dominant, copper cast, creating rose gold. Fourteen-carat gold-copper alloy is nearly identical in color to certain bronze alloys, and both may be used to produce police and other badges. Blue gold jewelry can be made by alloying with iron and purple gold can be made by alloying with aluminium, although rarely done except in specialized gold jewelry. Blue gold is more brittle and therefore more difficult to work with when making gold jewelry. Fourteen and eighteen carat gold alloys with silver alone appear greenish-yellow and are referred to as green gold. White gold jewelry can be made with palladium or nickel. Alternative white gold jewelry are available based on palladium, silver and other white metals, but the palladium alloys are more expensive than those using nickel. High-carat white gold jewelry is far more resistant to corrosion than are either pure silver or sterling silver.

 

Gold Production

Gold extraction is most economical in large, easily mined deposits. Since the 1880s, South Africa has been the source for a large proportion of the world’s gold supply, with about 50% of all gold ever produced having come from South Africa. Production in 1970 accounted for 79% of the world supply, producing about 1,480 tons. 2008 production was 2,260 tons. In 2007 China (with 276 tons) overtook South Africa as the world’s largest gold producer, the first time since 1905 that South Africa has not been the largest.

 

Gold Consumption

The consumption of gold produced in the world is about 50% in jewelry, 40% in investments, and 10% in industry. India is the world’s largest single consumer of gold, as Indians buy about 25% of the world’s gold, purchasing approximately 800 tons of gold every year, mostly for jewelry. India is also the largest importer of gold; in 2008, India imported around 400 tons of gold.

 

Gold Price

Like other precious metals, gold is measured by troy weight and by grams. When it is alloyed with other metals the term carat or karat is used to indicate the purity of gold present, with 24 carats being pure gold and lower ratings proportionally less. The purity of a gold bar or coin can also be expressed as a decimal figure ranging from 0 to 1, known as the millesimal fineness, such as 0.995 being very pure.

 

The price of gold is determined through trading in the gold and derivatives markets, but a procedure known as the Gold Fixing in London, originating in September 1919, provides a daily benchmark price to the industry. The afternoon fixing was introduced in 1968 to provide a price when US markets are open.

 

Historically gold coinage was widely used as currency; when paper money was introduced, it typically was a receipt redeemable for gold coin or bullion. In a monetary system known as the gold standard, a certain weight of gold was given the name of a unit of currency. Central banks still hold historical gold reserves as a store of value although the level has generally been declining. The largest gold depository in the world is that of the U.S. Federal Reserve Bank in New York, which holds about 3% of the gold ever mined, as does the similarly laden U.S. Bullion Depository at Fort Knox. In 2005 the World Gold Council estimated total global gold supply to be 3,859 tons and demand to be 3,754 tons, giving a surplus of 105 tons.

 

Since 1968 the price of gold has ranged widely, from a high of $850/oz ($27,300/kg) on January 21, 1980, to a low of $252.90/oz ($8,131/kg) on June 21, 1999. On December 2, 2009, Gold passed the important barrier of US$1200 per ounce to close at $1215. Gold further rallied hitting new highs in May 2010 after the European Union debt crisis prompted further purchase of gold as a safe asset. On March 1, 2011, gold hit a new all-time high of $1432.57, based on investor concerns regarding ongoing unrest in North Africa as well as in the Middle East. Since April 2001 the gold price has more than quintupled in value against the US dollar, hitting a new all-time high of $1,826 on August 18, 2011, prompting speculation that this long secular bear market has ended and a bull market has returned.

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